Didier Stevens

Monday 23 March 2015

split.py

Filed under: My Software — Didier Stevens @ 0:00

Split is a Python program to split text files into several parts.

Usage: split.py [options] file
Split a text file into X number of files (2 by default)

Options:
–version             show program’s version number and exit
-h, –help            show this help message and exit
-m, –man             Print manual
-p PARTS, –parts=PARTS
Number of parts to split the file into

Manual:

This program will split the given text file in 2 parts (2 parts by
default, the number of parts can be changed with option -p). Each
resulting file has suffix _part_?? where ?? is the number of the file
(01, 02, …). The extension remains the same.

The first line of text is written to _part_01, the second line of text
is written to _part_02, and so on, until the last part _part_?? is
written to. Then the cycle starts again with the first part _part_01.

split_V0_0_1.zip (https)
MD5: 49C0A77DA89376541073D09E010F7375
SHA256: 09D50C104AA4A32D963EB4254F48520ADB94A43BFF08FF68F8ADBA3C0ECC896A

7 Comments »

  1. […] split.py […]

    Pingback by split.py | infopunk.org — Monday 23 March 2015 @ 2:00

  2. How is this different from split (http://linux.die.net/man/1/split)

    Comment by Eknath Iyer (@eknath) — Monday 23 March 2015 @ 2:44

  3. @Eknath Like I explained, this split uses a round-robin scheme while *nix split does not.
    Do you need an example?

    Comment by Didier Stevens — Monday 23 March 2015 @ 16:33

  4. I read “The first line of text is written to _part_01” as The first _part_ of text to 01 and 2nd _part_ of test to 02… Sorry

    Comment by Eknath Iyer (@eknath) — Monday 23 March 2015 @ 22:29

  5. @Eknath No problem.

    Comment by Didier Stevens — Monday 23 March 2015 @ 22:30

  6. Hi Didier..Could you please look into this VB script and help me decode this VB script http://pastebin.com/6SfRuW6P

    Comment by Anonymous — Sunday 29 March 2015 @ 0:12

  7. @Someone There’s no need to post your comment three times. What is the MD5 hash of your sample?

    Comment by Didier Stevens — Sunday 29 March 2015 @ 8:37


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