Didier Stevens

Friday 28 August 2015

Test File: PDF With Embedded DOC Dropping EICAR

Filed under: PDF — Didier Stevens @ 9:30

Over at the SANS ISC diary I wrote a diary entry on the analysis of a PDF file that contains a malicious DOC file.

For testing purposes, I created a PDF file that contains a DOC file that drops the EICAR test file.

The PDF file contains JavaScript that extracts and opens the DOC file (with user approval). The DOC file contains a VBA script that executes upon opening of the file, and writes the EICAR test file to a temporary file in the %TEMP% folder.


You can download the PDF file here. It is in a password protected ZIP file. The password is eicardropper, with eicar written in uppercase: EICAR.

This will generate an anti-virus alert. Use at your own risk, with approval.
pdf-doc-vba-eicar-dropper.zip (https)
MD5: 65928D03CDF37FEDD7C99C33240CD196
SHA256: 48258AEC3786CB9BA032CD09DB09DC66E0EC8AA19677C299678A473895E79369

Friday 21 August 2015

Update: base64dump.py Version 0.0.2

Filed under: My Software,Update — Didier Stevens @ 9:35

A small update to my base64dump.py program: with option -n, you can specify the minimum length of the decoded base64 stream.

I use this when I have too many short strings detected as base64.

base64dump_V0_0_2.zip (https)
MD5: EE032FAB256D44B2907EAA716AD812C5
SHA256: 1E5801DD71C0FFA9CA90D2803B46275662E222D874E409FF31F83B21E6DEC080

Thursday 13 August 2015

Update: pdf-parser Version 0.6.4

Filed under: Malware,My Software,PDF,Update — Didier Stevens @ 0:00

In this new version of pdf-parser, option -H will now also calculate the MD5 hashes of the unfiltered and filtered stream of selected objects, and also dump the first 16 bytes. I needed this to analyze a malicious PDF that embeds a .docm file.


As you can see in this screenshot, the embedded file is a ZIP file (PK). .docm files are actually ZIP files.

pdf-parser_V0_6_4.zip (https)
MD5: 47A4C70AA281E1E80A816371249DCBD6
SHA256: EC8E64E3A74FCCDB7828B8ECC07A2C33B701052D52C43C549115DDCD6F0F02FE

Monday 3 August 2015

Jump List Forensics

Filed under: Forensics,My Software — Didier Stevens @ 0:00

Jump List files are actually OLE files. These files (introduced with Windows 7) give access to recently accessed applications and files. They have forensic value. You can find them in C:\Users\%USERNAME%\AppData\Roaming\Microsoft\Windows\Recent\AutomaticDestinations and C:\Users\%USERNAME%\AppData\Roaming\Microsoft\Windows\Recent\CustomDestinations.

The AutomaticDestinations files are the OLE files, so you can analyze them with oledump. There are a couple of tools that can extract information from these files.

Here you can see oledump analyzing an automatic Jump List file:


The stream DestList contains the Jump List data:


There are several sites on the Internet explaining the format of this data, like this one. I used this information to code a plugin for Jump List files:


The plugin takes an option (-f) to condense the information to just filenames:


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