Didier Stevens

Tuesday 23 October 2018

Update: pdf-parser.py Version 0.6.9

Filed under: My Software,PDF,Update — Didier Stevens @ 0:00

This new version of pdf-parser.py brings 2 new features; the idea came to me during private & public trainings I gave on malicious documents (if you are interested in a training, please get in touch).

The statistics option (-a –stats) has been enhanced with a search for keywords section:

In this section, the result of searches for particular keywords (that might indicate a malicious PDF) is displayed: you get the number of hits followed by the indices of the objects that contain this keyword.

In the example above, we see that object 11 contains JavaScript.

Remark that this section is the result of a search command (-s): search in pdf-parser is not case-senstive and partial (unlike PDFiD). That explains why /AA is found in object 37, while it’s actually /Aacute:

pdf-parser will also read file pdfid.ini (if present) so that the personal keywords you added to PDFiD are also used by pdf-parser.

–overridingfilters is a new option: it allows for the processing of streams with a different filter (or filter chain) than the one specified in the object’s dictionary. Use value raw to obtain the raw stream, without filtering.

pdf-parser_V0_6_9.zip (https)
MD5: 27D65A96FEAF157360ACBBAAB9748D27
SHA256: 3F102595B9EAE5842A1B4723EF965344AE3AB01F90D85ECA96E9678A6C7092B7

Sunday 29 October 2017

Update: pdf-parser.py Version 0.6.8

Filed under: My Software,PDF,Update — Didier Stevens @ 15:32

This is a bugfix version.

pdf-parser_V0_6_8.zip (https)
MD5: 7702EEA1C6173CB2E91AB88C5013FAF1
SHA256: 3424E6939E79CB597D32F405E2D75B2E42EF7629750D5DFB39927D5C132446EF

Wednesday 28 December 2016

Update: pdf-parser Version 0.6.7

Filed under: My Software,PDF,Update — Didier Stevens @ 12:03

I added option -k to search for keys in dictionaries. A usage example can be found in blog post “PDF Analysis: Back To Basics“.

pdf-parser_V0_6_7.zip (https)
MD5: D04D7DA42F3263139BC2C7E7B2621C91
SHA256: ED863DE952A5096FF4BE0825110D2726BA1BE75A7A6717AF0E6A153B843E3B78

Monday 28 November 2016

Update: pdf-parser Version 0.6.6

Filed under: Uncategorized — Didier Stevens @ 0:00

This new version of pdf-parser is a bugfix for /FLATEDECODE.

pdf-parser_V0_6_6.zip (https)
MD5: 47326468E1B5A1AF7BB8AD63688804D9
SHA256: 51C9B25B939B135D9949E51463F58ECEC0BEBEFB9C0EAA0B93326CBFB4D8F061

Saturday 30 July 2016

Bugfix: pdf-parser Version 0.6.5

Filed under: My Software,PDF,Update — Didier Stevens @ 16:19

This is a bugfix for pdf-parser. Streams were not properly extracted when they started with whitespace after the normal whitespace following the stream keyword.

pdf-parser_V0_6_5.zip (https)
MD5: 7F0880EB8A954979CA0ADAB2087E1C55
SHA256: E7D2CCA12CC43D626C53873CFF0BC0CE2875330FD5DBC8FB23B07396382DCC85

Thursday 13 August 2015

Update: pdf-parser Version 0.6.4

Filed under: Malware,My Software,PDF,Update — Didier Stevens @ 0:00

In this new version of pdf-parser, option -H will now also calculate the MD5 hashes of the unfiltered and filtered stream of selected objects, and also dump the first 16 bytes. I needed this to analyze a malicious PDF that embeds a .docm file.

20150812-215754

As you can see in this screenshot, the embedded file is a ZIP file (PK). .docm files are actually ZIP files.

pdf-parser_V0_6_4.zip (https)
MD5: 47A4C70AA281E1E80A816371249DCBD6
SHA256: EC8E64E3A74FCCDB7828B8ECC07A2C33B701052D52C43C549115DDCD6F0F02FE

Wednesday 29 April 2015

pdf-parser: A Method To Manipulate PDFs Part 2

Filed under: My Software,PDF — Didier Stevens @ 0:00

I provide 2 days of Hacking PDF training at HITB Amsterdam. This is one of the methods I teach.

Maarten Van Horenbeeck posted a diary entry (July 2008) explaining how scripts and data are stored in PDF documents (using streams), and demonstrated a Perl script to decompress streams. A couple of months before, I had started developing my pdf-parser tool, and Maarten’s diary entry motivated me to continue adding features to pdf-parser.

Extracting and decompressing a stream (for example containing a JavaScript script) is easy with pdf-parser. You select the object that contains the stream (example object 5: -o 5) and you “filter” the content of the stream (-f ). The command is:

pdf-parser.py –o 5 –f sample.pdf

In PDF jargon, streams are compressed using filters. You have all kinds of filters, for example ZLIB DEFLATE, but also lossy compressions like JPEG. pdf-parser supports a couple of filters, but not all, because the implementation of some of them (mostly the lossy ones) differs between vendors and PDF applications.

 

A recent article published by Virus Bulletin on JavaScript stored inside a lossy stream gave me the opportunity to implement a method I had worked out manually.

The problem: you need to decompress a stream and you have no decompression algorithm.

The solution: you use the PDF application to decompress the stream.

The method: you create a new PDF document with the stream as embedded file, and then save the embedded file using the PDF application.

The detailed method: when you need to decompress a stream for which you have no decompressor (or no decompressor identical to the target application), you create a new PDF document into which you include the object with the stream as an embedded file. PDF documents support embedded files. For example, if you have a PDF document explaining a financial method, you can include a spreadsheet in the PDF document as an embedded file. The embedded file is stored as an object with a stream, and the compression can be any method supported by the PDF application. Crafting this PDF document with embedded file manually requires many manipulations and calculations, and is thus a very good candidate for automation.

Figure: this PDF embeds a file called vbanner2.jpg

With pdf-parser, you can use this method as follows:

  1. Create a Python program that generates the PDF document with embedded file. Use pdf-parser like this (in this example, the data stream you want to decompress is in object 5 of PDF file sample.pdf): pdf-parser.py –generateembedded 5 sample.pdf > embedded.py
  2. Execute the Python program to create the PDF file: embedded.py embedded.pdf
  3. Open the created PDF file embedded.pdf with the target application (Adobe Reader for the Virus Bulletin example), and save the embedded file to disk
  4. The saved file contains the decompressed stream

You can find my PDF tools here.

Remark: the generated Python program requires my module mPDF.py, which can also be found on my PDF tools page.

Remark 2: don’t use this method when the stream contains an exploit for the decompressor.

Thursday 16 April 2015

pdf-parser: A Method To Manipulate PDFs Part 1

Filed under: My Software,PDF,Update — Didier Stevens @ 0:00

I provide 2 days of Hacking PDF training at HITB Amsterdam. This is one of the methods I teach.

Sometimes when I analyze PDF documents (benign or malicious), I want to reduce the PDF to its essential objects. But when one removes objects in a PDF, indexes need to be updated and references updated/removed. To automate this process as much as possible, I updated my pdf-parser program to generate a Python program that in turn, generates the original PDF.

Thus when I want to make changes to the PDF (like removing objects), I generate its corresponding Python program, and then I edit this Python program.

I do this simply with option -g.

20150415-233047

Then you can edit the Python program, and when you run it, it will generate a new PDF file.

You can also use option -g together with option -f to filter the streams before they are inserted in the Python program. This gives you the decompressed streams in the Python program, opening them up to editing.

In this example, without option -f the Python statement for the stream object is:

oPDF.stream(5, 0, 'x\x9cs\nQ\xd0w3T02Q\x08IS040P0\x07\xe2\x90\x14\x05\r\x8f\xd4\x9c\x9c|\x85\xf0\xfc\xa2\x9c\x14M\x85\x90,\x05\xd7\x10\x00\xdfn\x0b!', '<<\r\n /Length %d\r\n /Filter /FlateDecode\r\n>>')

And with option -f, it becomes:

oPDF.stream2(5, 0, 'BT /F1 24 Tf 100 700 Td (Hello World) Tj ET', '', 'f')

The generated Python program relies on my mPDF library found in my PDF make tools.

pdf-parser_V0_6_2.zip (https)
MD5: D6717F1CA6B9DA2392E63F0DABF590DD
SHA256: 4DC0136062E9A5B6D84C74696005531609BD0299887B70DDFFAA19115BF2E746

Tuesday 31 March 2015

pdf-parser And YARA

Filed under: My Software,PDF — Didier Stevens @ 21:13

I’m teaching a PDF class at HITB Amsterdam in May. This is one of the many subjects covered in the class.

For about half a year now, I’ve been adding YARA support to several of my analysis tools. Like pdf-parser.

I’ll write some blogposts covering each tool with YARA support. I’ll start with a video for pdf-parser:

Wednesday 18 September 2013

Update: pdf-parser V0.4.3

Filed under: My Software,PDF — Didier Stevens @ 20:20

There’s still time to register for my “Hacking PDF” training at Brucon next week.

I introduced a bug in pdf-parser version 0.3.8 that changed the behavior of the -w option (raw).

This new version is a fix for this bug.

pdf-parser_V0_4_3.zip (https)
MD5: 2220FFE37AEA36FC593AE33440385E76
SHA256: 1416624938359FDD375108D922350D1B7B0E41B3A40A48F778D6D72D8A405DE6

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